Science by Design: Exploring the Details of Exploratory Hall

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In Exploratory Hall’s tile floor, the circles represent splashes of water droplets, the squiggles are the outline of a double helix, and the Fibonacci spiral shows up cutting through it all. The “Periodic Tables” provide a visual pun. Photo by Alexis Glenn

Summary

There’s nothing random about Exploratory Hall.

In fact, the operative word during its five years of renovation and development was “intentionality.” The layout, the fixtures, the furnishings, the flooring, the lighting and even the wood panel in one of the three-story atriums are all intentional by design. II, is rich with subtle details that enrich the collaboration between student to professor, and student to student, while surrounding them with symbols of science.

Mason News  Sept. 9, 2013
by Buzz McClain

There’s nothing random about Exploratory Hall.

In fact, the operative word during its five years of renovation and development was “intentionality.” The layout, the fixtures, the furnishings, the flooring, the lighting and even the wood panel in one of the three-story atriums are all intentional by design. The building, which was formerly known as Science and Tech II, is rich with subtle details that enrich the collaboration between student to professor, and student to student, while surrounding them with symbols of science.

In Exploratory Hall’s tile floor, the circles represent splashes of water droplets, the squiggles are the outline of a double helix, and the Fibonacci spiral shows up cutting through it all. The “Periodic Tables” provide a visual pun.  Photo by Alexis Glenn

In Exploratory Hall’s tile floor, the circles represent splashes of water droplets, the squiggles are the outline of a double helix, and the Fibonacci spiral shows up cutting through it all. The “Periodic Tables” provide a visual pun. Photo by Alexis Glenn

Take a look at that wood panel. It looks like a series of small squares offset with larger squares, and for some designers, that would be decorative enough for a wall hanging. But Exploratory Hall’s panel depicts the geometric derivation of theFibonacci spiral, in which each subsequent number is the sum of the previous two. While STEM aficionados might recognize it, others will need to have it pointed out, but once seen, it’s always seen.

[youtube]http://youtu.be/lNmoNhYCDRE[/youtube]

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